BioCeuticals Zinc Drops (50ml) Vanilla Flavour

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BioCeuticals Zinc Drops (50ml) Vanilla Flavour

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These liquid zinc drops are easy to take and easy on the stomach!

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Biological roles of zinc[3-5]

  • Immune cell function
  • Prostate and sperm health
  • Normal skin function
  • Blood glucose metabolism
  • Growth and development
  • Antioxidant activity

Zinc deficiency
It is thought that 20-25% of people have inadequate zinc intakes.[6]

The primary cause of zinc deficiency is consumption of diets that contain low quantities of the mineral. Repeated studies of westernised diets indicate that most populations consume less than the American recommended daily allowance (RDA: 15mg for men, 12mg for women).[7] Individual zinc requirements for Australians by age and gender are detailed in Table 1.

Secondary causes of zinc deficiency are illnesses that impair dietary intake or intestinal absorption, and/or increase losses of zinc in intestinal contents or urine. 

  • Taking more than 50mg of zinc per day over a period of weeks may interfere with copper bioavailability.[1]
  • Substances that may affect zinc absorption or excretion include high dietary calcium intake, coffee, folate, supplemental iron, NSAIDs, antibiotics and diuretics. Separate by two hours.[2]

[1] Drake VJ. Zinc. Micronutrient information center, Linus Pauling Institute 2013. Viewed 10 June 2014, http://lpi.oregonstate.edu/infocenter/minerals/zinc/ 
[2] Braun L, Cohen M. Herbs and natural supplements: an evidence-based guide, 3rd ed. Sydney: Churchill Livingstone Elsevier, 2010.
[3] Tuerk MJ and Fazel N. Zinc deficiency. Curr Opin Gastroent 2009;25(2):136-143.
[4] Ebisch IM, Thomas CM, Peters WH, et al. The importance of folate, zinc and antioxidants in the pathogenesis and prevention of subfertility. Hum Repro Update 2007;13(2):163-174.
[5] Hess SY, Lonnerdal B, Hotz C, et al. Recent advances in knowledge of zinc nutrition and human health. Food Nutr Bull 2009;30(1 Suppl):S5-S11.
[6] Zinc fact sheet for health professionals. National Institutes of Health 2013. Viewed 10 June 2014, http://ods.od.nih.gov/factsheets/Zinc-HealthProfessional/
[7] Schauss AG. Suggested optimum nutrient intake of vitamins, minerals, and trace elements. In: Pizzorno JE Jr, Murray MT, Textbook of natural medicine, 3rd ed (pp.1275-1320). St Louis: Churchill Livingstone Elsevier, 2006.
[8] Department of Health and Ageing, National Health and Medical Research Council, Ministry of Health. Nutrient References Values for Australia and New Zealand. Commonwealth of Australia, 2006.
[9] Langley A, Mangas S (Eds). Zinc: Report of an international meeting, 12-13 September 1996, Adelaide. National Environmental Health Monographs, Metal Series No. 2. Department of Human Services, 1997.

Recommended Dosage:

Adults: Take 5 drops (120 μL) in water or juice once daily, or as directed by your healthcare practitioner.

Children and Adolescents: Give 5 drops (120 μL) in water or juice once daily, or as directed by your healthcare practitioner.