Innate Response Homocysteine Response™ ( 90 tablets)

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Innate Response Homocysteine Response™ ( 90 tablets) - supplement facts.JPG
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Innate Response Homocysteine Response™ ( 90 tablets) - supplement facts.JPG

Innate Response Homocysteine Response™ ( 90 tablets)

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Maintains already healthy homocysteine levels.

  • FoodState Nutrient™ vitamins B6, B12 and folate for enhanced digestibility and nutritional value.

  • 800 mcg of folate delivered in broccoli

  • Organic whole food blend includes beet root

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The correct balance of homocysteine, an amino acid that breaks down protein, in the blood is important for optimal health. Although it is not possible to get homocysteine from the diet,
it is made through a chemical reaction with methionine, an amino acid present in meat, dairy and fish. Adequate levels of B vitamins are important to help convert homocysteine to cysteine, which then supports many metabolic functions and contributes to heart, brain and vascular system function.[1],[2]. A balanced diet, with adequate amounts of fruit and leafy vegetables, and regular exercise, can help maintain healthy homocysteine levels.

Unfortunately, many people are at risk for elevated homocysteine levels due to an unhealthy lifestyle or a deficiency in vitamins B6, B12 and folate. Elevated homocysteine is most commonly found in elderly populations and in men. Given this, many patients might benefit from supplementation. INNATE Response’sTM Homocysteine ResponseTM contains key B vitamins from food sources to help patients keep homocysteine at a healthy level.

Key Ingredients

Vitamin B6, B12 and folate

Researchers have only recently discovered the importance of B vitamins for homocysteine balance. B6, B12 and folate, all play an important part. A recent study noted that both B12 and folate supplementation, accompanied by lifestyle changes, helped to support healthy heart and vascular function.[4]

Deficiency of folate may also impact homocysteine levels. A May 2016 study noted that patients with the MTHFR 677T genotype and are unable to methylate may be at a higher risk of developing unhealthy levels of homocysteine.[5] In this case, the combined effect of all three B vitamins may be key. A 2016 meta-analysis suggests that taking folic acid, along with B6 and 12, can support ideal levels of homocysteine.[6]

Although diet and lifestyle interventions are always important for optimal health, science does suggest that the effects of B vitamins are critical to homocysteine response regardless of exercise.u A study of elderly patients noted that homocysteine levels were impacted by B vitamins independent of their physical activity.[7]

Though there are no symptoms for elevated homocysteine levels, patients with a diet high in meat and dairy and who may also be low in B vitamins might benefit from a supplement to help them maintain healthy homocysteine levels.

The FoodState NutrientsTM Advantage

INNATE knows that the complexity of food in a supplement helps to enhance its benefits. That is why Homocysteine Response is made with FoodState Nutrients from whole foods that are either milled and concentrated or enriched with vitamins and minerals. We make them with fresh, local foods, such as broccoli, beets, cranberries, cabbage and organic brown rice, that arrive daily from our farm partners.

Sources:

  1. Lan X, et al. Meta-analysis on effect of combined supplementation of folic acid, vitamin B12 and B6 on risk of cardio-cerebrovascular diseases in randomized control trials. Zhonghua Liu Xing Bing Xue Za Zhi 2016 Jul;37(7):1028-34. Doi: 10.3760/cma.j.issn.0254-6450.20106.07.024

  2. Bonetti F, et al. The relationship between hyperhomocysteinemia and neurodegeneration. Neurodegenerative Disease Management 2016 April;6(2):133-145.

  3. Tayebi A et al. Effect of vitamin B12 supplementation on serum homocysteine in patients undergoing hemodialysis: A randomized controlled trial. Saudi J Kidney Dis Transpl 2016 Mar;27(2)256-62.

  4. Zhang J, et al. Hyperhomocysteinemia is associated with B12 deficiency: A cross-sectional study in a rural elderly population of Shanxi, China. J Nutr Health Aging 2016;20(6):594-601.

  5. Abd-Elmawla MA, et al. Impact of Genetic Polymorphism of methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase C677T on Development of Hyperhomocystenemia and Related Oxidative Changes in

    Egyptian β-Thalassemia Major Patients. PLOS 2016 May 17. http://dx.doi.org/10/1371/journal.pone.0155070.

  6. Ibid. Zhonghua Liu Xing Bing Xue Za Zhi 2016

  7. Alomari MA. Effect of physical activity on levels fo homocysteine, folate and vitamin B12 in the elderly. Phys Sportsmed 2016;44(1):68-73.