Innate Response Iron Response™ (90 tablets)

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Innate Response Iron Response™ (90 tablets) - supplement facts.JPG
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Innate Response Iron Response™ (90 tablets) - supplement facts.JPG

Innate Response Iron Response™ (90 tablets)

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Helps maintain healthy iron levels.

  • FoodState Nutrient™ iron, vitamin C, folate, and vitamin B12 for enhanced digestibility and nutritional value.

  • Easy to digest and non-constipating.

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Iron deficiency is the most common and widespread nutritional disorder in the world, affecting large numbers of children and women in both developing and industrialized countries. According to World Health Organization estimates, two billion people worldwide have anemia and approximately half of these cases can be attributed to iron deficiency.[1]

Iron is an essential micronutrient that plays a vital role in the formation of red blood cells and also allows the body to produce enzymes, hormones and other substances critical for proper growth and development.[2] Many patients do not get enough iron in their diet. Vegetarians and vegans in particular, are challenged because beef is a primary source of both iron and zinc. In addition, supplementing with traditional forms of iron is questionable because often these forms are not well absorbed and can cause digestive upset.

Iron ResponseTM offers a unique more bioavailable option with iron that is delivered in a FoodState NutrientTM with Saccharomyces cerevisiae. FoodState Nutrients are designed to be nutrient-rich complexes with enhanced digestibility and nutritional value. Paired with vitamin C, vitamin B12, folate, beet root and phenolics, the formula offers optimal absorption.

Enhanced bioavailability

It has long been known that absorption of iron can be enhanced with food components, such as ascorbic acid or meat/fish, or by decreasing content of inhibitors, such as phytates and tannins.3 FoodState Nutrient iron is delivered with S. cerevisiae, which improves its bioavailability.

The formula is also enhanced with synergistic cofactors that aid absorption and provide healthy cardiovascular support.u One is beet root, which has a long history of use going back to Ancient Rome and Greece. Beets are a natural source of dietary nitrates that the body converts to nitrite and then to nitric oxide, which in turn supports optimal blood flow and delivery of oxygen to the muscles. This theory was supported in a 2009 study from the Journal of Applied Physiology that found dietary nitrate supplementation in the form of beet juice reduced oxygen cost of sub-maximal exercise and enhanced tolerance to high intensity exercise, which suggests a possible benefit of beet juice for pulmonary function.[4]

It is also known that beets are rich in folate and works synergistically with vitamin B12 to help form red blood cells.[5]

A unique iron formula

Iron Response provides an easy-to-digest, non-constipating form of iron with cofactors vitamin C, folate, vitamin B12 and phenolics in a new easy-to-swallow tablet. The formula is also the only iron supplement on the market with FoodState Nutrients, which aids in its digestibility and bioavailability.

Sources:

1. WHO/UNICEF/UNU. Iron deficiency anaemia: assessment, prevention, and control. Geneva, World Health Organization, 2001 (WHO/NHD/01.3). (http://www.who.int/nut/documents/ida_assessment_ prevention_control.pdf, accessed 27 July 2004)

2. WHO/UNICEF/UNU. Micronutrients. http://www.who.int/nutrition/topics/micronutrients/en/

3. Hallberg L, Brune M, Rossander L., The role of vitamin C in iron absorption. Int J Vitam Nutr Res Suppl. 1989;30:103-8.

4. Stephen J. Bailey, Paul Winyard, et. al. Dietary nitrate supplementation reduces the O2 cost of low-intensity exercise and enhances tolerance to high-intensity exercise in humans. Journal of Applied Physiology Published 1 October 2009 Vol. 107 no. 4, 1144-1155 DOI: 10.1152/japplphysiol.00722.2009

5. Medline, Updated by: Emily Wax, RD, The Brooklyn Hospital Center, Brooklyn, NY. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Isla Ogilvie, PhD, and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team. Feb. 2015